Vidli.com's Licensing Model Appears on Right Track

As I’ve reported here over the past weeks, Vidli.com, The Official Video Licensor is launching in early 2010. They hope to provide the copyright owners of videos with the ability to monetize them with licensing fees. This instead of the current generally accepted model of placing ads in front of, during and after the playing of the video.

The other way to generate revenues to charge for subscriptions to a site that plays all of your favorite videos. In veiled promises, both Youtube and Ooyala have indicated they are leaning towards pay to watch models “in the near future”.

None of the video delivery networks are yet willing to make the stand on just when they are going to start charging visitors to watch videos they serve. It’s clear this business model, one which Vidli.com hopes to compete in is heading somewhere. Vidli just hopes it’s towards profitability.

Some of today’s pertinent stories about video monetization, pay per view (or pay per video as Ooyala’s calling it now), and video licensing:

YouTube Is the Top Social Media Innovation of the Decade

YouTube didn’t even exist for more than half the decade, but a perfect storm of increasing bandwidth, advances in Flash, and the rise of social networks (where YouTube content could be embedded) made 2005 the perfect time for the site to make its debut. The growth was meteoric, and within 18 months, the website became one of the most trafficked on the web and the company was sold to Google for $1.6 billion

Video Monetization via Pay Per View – Ooyala Interview

I Interviewed Bismark Lepe, Founder and President of Products for the online video platform Ooyala , about how their solution also allows content providers to make money from their “premium” video content via subscription models and pay-per-video (PPV) models – or what I refer to as, “video for sale.” I caught up with Bismark after his session at the recent Streaming Media West / Online Video Platform Summit in San Jose, California, where he was speaking on the panel, Defining Online Video Platforms . As the session preview stated, “There have never been more people publishing online video, and there have never been more online video platform solutions on the market. But with so many choices, it can be confusing to decide what services are right for your online video initiatives.”

YouTube Paid Video Could Come “In the Not Too Distant Future”

YouTube is serving up more than a billion videos per day and all of them are free. That could change soon, says YouTube executive David Eun. Eun, who runs partnerships for Google’s site, confirmed earlier reports that YouTube is looking to stream movies and/or TV shows that aren’t available on the site now and won’t be supported by advertising. So someone, either consumers themselves or a sponsor who picks up the tab, would need to pay for them directly. When? “In the not too distant future,” Eun says–while leaving enough wiggle room for Google (GOOG) to avoid actually saying that it is committed to any particular plan.

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