Vidli.com's Licensing Model Appears on Right Track

As I’ve reported here over the past weeks, Vidli.com, The Official Video Licensor is launching in early 2010. They hope to provide the copyright owners of videos with the ability to monetize them with licensing fees. This instead of the current generally accepted model of placing ads in front of, during and after the playing of the video.
The other way to generate revenues to charge for subscriptions to a site that plays all of your favorite videos. In veiled promises, both Youtube and Ooyala have indicated they are leaning towards pay to watch models “in the near future”.
None of the video delivery networks are yet willing to make the stand on just when they are going to start charging visitors to watch videos they serve. It’s clear this business model, one which Vidli.com hopes to compete in is heading somewhere. Vidli just hopes it’s towards profitability.
Some of today’s pertinent stories about video monetization, pay per view (or pay per video as Ooyala’s calling it now), and video licensing:

YouTube Is the Top Social Media Innovation of the Decade

YouTube didn’t even exist for more than half the decade, but a perfect storm of increasing bandwidth, advances in Flash, and the rise of social networks (where YouTube content could be embedded) made 2005 the perfect time for the site to make its debut. The growth was meteoric, and within 18 months, the website became one of the most trafficked on the web and the company was sold to Google for $1.6 billion

Video Monetization via Pay Per View – Ooyala Interview

I Interviewed Bismark Lepe, Founder and President of Products for the online video platform Ooyala , about how their solution also allows content providers to make money from their “premium” video content via subscription models and pay-per-video (PPV) models – or what I refer to as, “video for sale.” I caught up with Bismark after his session at the recent Streaming Media West / Online Video Platform Summit in San Jose, California, where he was speaking on the panel, Defining Online Video Platforms . As the session preview stated, “There have never been more people publishing online video, and there have never been more online video platform solutions on the market. But with so many choices, it can be confusing to decide what services are right for your online video initiatives.”

YouTube Paid Video Could Come “In the Not Too Distant Future”

YouTube is serving up more than a billion videos per day and all of them are free. That could change soon, says YouTube executive David Eun. Eun, who runs partnerships for Google’s site, confirmed earlier reports that YouTube is looking to stream movies and/or TV shows that aren’t available on the site now and won’t be supported by advertising. So someone, either consumers themselves or a sponsor who picks up the tab, would need to pay for them directly. When? “In the not too distant future,” Eun says–while leaving enough wiggle room for Google (GOOG) to avoid actually saying that it is committed to any particular plan.

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Where will Vidli.com Fit into the Value Add Chain of Online Video Monetization?

As the new year is strapping up its boots and getting ready to launch us all into a brand new decade, those of you (and I) interested in online video may be wondering what’s next. As I continue my quest to become Vidli.com’s next Social Media person (you can help by clicking here and signing up to receive a free beta invite. TIA!) I find myself learning more and more about the marketplace.
The work I’ve done in the past for EPI, LLC (where I’m a founding partner) as we attempt to launch TheFightChannel.com, an all fighting online video network has been very educational. In fact, during 2008 I actually designed and submitted to applications for patent protection on processes to deliver audio and video online in new and unique fashion.
Couple the above with the thousands of hours of fight related video we hope to one day launch to fight fans around the world, and you can better understand why having all this knowledge around video licensing and monetization is important. From a business model perspective, we needed to be able to talk to content owners in terms they could understand.
So, now I’m more closely following the happenings in delivery, licensing, monetization and more in the world of online video. Following are some interesting stories from the past couple of days.

Internet TV advances with Boxee Beta and FCC probe

The maturation of Internet TV software like Boxee signals a shift to a more distributed media environment. However, bridging the gap between television and online media is a difficult proposition, not least because traditional content producers are slow to embrace these services.

How Digital Distribution is Changing Viewers Habits {Web Strategies for storytelling}

This paper will identify the current advancement of digital distribution channels and its viewers imminent behavior habits. I hope to prove that today filmmakers, storytellers, and documentary producers can now bypass the traditional methods of video circulation and target their own markets directly using social media websites, live streaming and video podcasting.

New Year’s Wishes For Online Video In 2010

The very best thing to happen to the execution side of our business in 2009 was the emergence and adoption of the VAST standard. VAST compliance allows buyers of inventory to integrate with publishers in a matter of hours, as opposed to custom integration processes that could take days, weeks or months. The efficiencies inherent to VAST enable increased productivity across the board by letting buyers get time-sensitive campaigns up faster, dramatically reducing the potential for errors caused through manual trafficking, and by allowing publishers to significantly reduce trafficking burden. A growing VAST adoption rate coupled with more embracement of standards will benefit all participants in the online video value chain.

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