Pondering the Vidli.com Contest

Camera Sony HDR-FX1 HDV Handycam Camcorder
Image via Wikipedia

Still only a few hours left in the contest being run by soon to be released Vidli.com. If you spend any time at all reading the posts here at BG, you likely know that I’ve been participating in their Social Media challenge. They designed an interesting way to weed out the wannabe Social Media “expert” types from those that can actually produce results.
The rules? Simple: sign up, get URL that points people to Vidli’s Beta Invitation sign up form, get people to sign up for their free beta program to be launched early 2010. The top five referrers are then invited to talk with Vidli folk in order to be further considered for the new position they are hiring for.
Some saw this as an exploitation of unemployed workers to further Vidli’s cause. Obviously, even in a losing effort, I never considered this to be taking advantage of me. Just like my response to those that argue Boxing is an exploitive sport: no one makes fighters step into the ring and compete based upon mutually agreeable rules and regulations.
Hell, even Nelson Mandela is on record as being a big fight fan. It’s true!
Anyway, if you are into making videos for whatever topic or niche, being able to monetize them is usually a lofty goal. Sure some of them are simply created to market other products or brands, but of the billions of videos viewed everyday online, only a super small percentage have any sort of video monetization associated with them.
If Vidli.com lives up to its self professed promises, the opportunities for you Camtasia, Pling, screen grabbing, Audacity recording junkies to make some money seems quite good.
Even though I didn’t get into the top five, I know the methods I chose to employ in this contest were sound, longer tail applications of using both social media marketing and solid content creation. There were several contestants that started emulating my techniques after they observed my efforts in action. Must be something to that, you know?
In a nutshell, this pursuit isn’t over. 2010 is just a few hours away. As such, I’m already working on taking advantage of this exercise in its fullest. As those products are ready, I’ll be sure to post information here for you lucky friends of mine that subscribe to this feed. If you don’t subscribe to this feed, no worries, just click here.
If you were among the 35 who took the time and put forth the effort to sign up thank you so very much. I am grateful that you efforted to help me out. Promise to make you proud!

Ebay Stuff

[affmage source=”ebay” results=”2″]audio video equipment[/affmage]

Amazon Stuff

[affmage source=”amazon” results=”2″]video creation[/affmage]

Overstock Stuff

[affmage source=”overstock” results=”2″]video camera[/affmage]

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Rendering Video Monetization with the Best Metrics

$5700
Creative Commons License photo credit: AMagill

From ripping off live MMA to trying to figure out just what works and doesn’t regarding the monetization of online video, today’s stories are all about searching for the answers.
Startup companies like Vidli.com will definitely need to be way on top of their game if they are going to go head to head with the Ooyala’s, Apple’s and Ustream’s of the video delivery world.
We shall see! In the meantime, here’s what seems to be more pertinent snippets about licensing video and delivering profitability and ROI to the content owners and network operators. Just click through on the headlines to read their entire stories.

The Future of In-Stream Video Advertising for Yu and Me

On the topic of measuring performance for online video advertising campaigns, Jayant agrees that what may be considered acceptable performance metrics for many interactive ad formats does not necessarily translate in terms of measuring the complete success of a video advertising initiative.
“In the search business and in the display business, the primary metric people use is clicks… In video, depending on the campaign, a click may not be the best metric… You have a myriad of things that you can try…”

Apple TV Talk, Talk, Talk, Talk

Once again, talking about Apple’s future as a multichannel video distributor is all the rage. But people familiar with the discussions between Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) and video programmers over a possible subscription package say the talk is far ahead of the action, one reason why details are still murky. If the subscription package could be pulled off with an announcement from a single player, I have no doubt Disney (NYSE: DIS), which isn’t commenting about this but multiple sources tell me is open to the idea, would be first in line.

UFC targets online piracy. Let’s just hope it doesn’t go all RIAA on us

It’s been a running theme for the past few years, and as more and more people get faster Internet connections, and as video compression technology continues to improve, we’re going to be hearing a lot more about it. I refer, of course (of course!), to illegal streams of live sporting events. Whether you’re firing up TVAnts on Sunday to watch Arsenal take on Aston Villa, or trolling USTREAM for a live feed of WWE’s Royal Rumble, or looking for MMA-TV to watch this month’s UFC pay-per-view, you are, in fact, breaking the law. Not only are you breaking the law, but you may even be taking money away from the companies/teams/sports you purport to support. But is that all there is to it?

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Cool Amazon Stuff

[affmage source=”amazon” results=”3″]blueray[/affmage]

Cool Overstock.com Stuff

[affmage source=”overstock” results=”3″]blueray[/affmage]

If Vidli Takes on YouTube & Ooyala, Who Wins?

. . . and tellys!
Creative Commons License photo credit: Elsie esq.

As Vidli.com prepares to enter the video licensing and monetization market, they’ll find the stakes getting higher by the moment.
Recently, video site giant, YouTube has been heard mumbling they may begin to offer premium content, ala Hulu.com, but for a fee. To be fair, similar whispers have also been rumored to be true for Hulu as well.
Another upstarting video delivery company, Ooyala, former winner of Amazon’s Web Services Start-up Challenge has steadily built up its offerings to be a contender in both live streaming of video events as well as on-demand delivery. Earlier reviews of their services showed interesting video monetization via ad insertions as well as a number of other methods.
The question for newcomer Vidli.com is whether or not they will be able to jump into the fray and compete with the big boys and girls of video delivery. From the Vidli blog, their aim is to “help people buy, sell and rent videos online.”
There’s clearly a lot of content to go around and it seems that any new entry into the space should be able to forge a successful business if they go about things correctly. Of course in today’s world of monetizing video online, knowing the correct course IS the battle!
Following are two stories characterizing Vidli’s challenges as they enter this sphere.

Vans Triple Crown of Surfing and Ooyala Team Up to Give Fans a Front Row Seat

The Vans Triple Crown of Surfing presented by Rockstar Energy Drink, the last stop on the Association of Surfing Professionals (ASP) World Tour, known for attracting top-ranked surfers looking to battle it out with the world’s biggest and most popular waves, teamed up with Ooyala, a leading provider of end-to-end video platform applications and services, to deliver first-class viewer experiences with continual live-streaming coverage.
Ooyala’s live streaming technology allows customers to create and manage live streams within the same console from which they manage their Video-on-Demand content. The native support of live streaming makes it very quick and easy to showcase coverage of key events, reaching broader audiences worldwide. Ooyala’s analytics engine provides real-time viewership data for key metrics such as the number of plays, displays, amount of video watched, geographical distribution and domain distribution.

YouTube considers pay-for movies and TV shows in push to attract new content

A senior executive said they were considering allowing pay-for content to encourage more media companies to license premium movies and TV shows on the popular video-sharing website. Although YouTube is the most visited video site in the U.S. with more than 125 million users a month, many analysts see rival Hulu, which carries full length shows, as the future of the Web video business.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

What's Next in Video Monetization and Premium Content Licensing

YouTube, LLC

We’re seeing a number of announcements by the big boy companies attempting to grab major foothold share in video monetization industries. Companies like Google’s YouTube is considering a subscription model in an attempt to entice premium content copyright holders to use their system.

Hulu, LLC

A move like that would place them in direct competition with Hulu.com with whom it is anticipated will start its own subscription model soon after the new year. Clearly however, in that marketplace, with Hulu’s owners being Disney, NBCU, and FOX, they have an advantage in getting that premium content.
For everyone else that’s not a Google or Hulu, there might be hope to make money with their copyrighted video by using Vidli.com, the Official Video Licensor. Their stated goals are to provide a place for you to sell, rent and buy videos online.
Here’s some snippets of stories that jumped out at me today. What do you think?

Widevine raises $15M for delivering web video to consumer gear

$15M for delivering web video to consumer gear
Widevine has raised $15 million in funding for its business of delivering video to web-connected consumer electronics gear. The company’s technology includes video optimization, which means it will size the video for a particular display and play it at a rate that matches the speed of its Internet connection. It lets consumers bookmark, fast forward, or rewind Internet video. The content it distributes has digital rights management to prevent piracy.

How You Can Make Money Remixing Someone Else’s Stuff

Our model also gives property owners a structure for inviting the creative community to collaboratively help the owner build out content on a scale not feasible under traditional approaches, which translates to new opportunities for fans to engage meaningfully in their favorite entertainment.
Imagine a video game developer releasing a new title. They could spend thousands of dollars on an alternate reality game, which is basically a one-time marketing expense that – hopefully – will generate indirect revenue by driving sales of the new title. Or, they could selectively open up certain elements of the game world and allow fans to create original works of fiction, art, comics, video, music, etc. within the video game property.

YouTube looks at subscriptions, more ad dollars

YouTube is considering offering users the option to pay for subscriptions in a bid to encourage more media companies to license premium TV shows and movies to the popular online video site, a senior executive said.
YouTube, which is owned by Internet search giant Google, is already known to have held talks with several major movie studios about renting movies.

Paramount Begins Licensing Clips Online, With Help from Digitalsmiths

What do you do when your DVD business starts to show serious signs of decline? If you’re Paramount, you look for ways to create a new revenue stream from your existing catalog of video content. With that in mind, the movie studio today launched ParamountClips.com, a warehouse of short-form video assets created and indexed with the help of Digitalsmiths.
The site will enable users to license clips from Paramount titles such as The Godfather, Forrest Gump and Top Gun, all without reaching out to the studio to do so.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

How Could Vidli.com have Helped PBS NewsHour

As reported on The Official Google Blog today, YouTube is now hosting daily news reports from the (amazingly great!) PBS NewsHour. All very cool and a great way to get the content when you’re not in front of your television.
PBS logo (October 4, 1971 to September 30, 1984) But what if PBS had simply used a service like Vidli.com, The Official Video Licensor?
If you go to the NewsHour page on YouTube, you’ll immediately notice there are no advertisements on the page. Maybe they plan to have in roll spots in an attempt at their video monetization, however, it is unclear how they are going to support their business mode.
With the amazing video licensing that Vidli plans on providing content owners, it would seem to be a no brainer for a company that is generating this much content to consider using their services. Add to this mix the fact that Vidli has some amazing marketing efforts that will virtually ensure somebody like PBS NewsHour would be able to turn a nice profit by promoting their video online.
[youtube rDNLcnBnF5I 500 315]
After nearly 35 years on air, PBS NewsHour recently re-launched its broadcast program and website in an effort to provide viewers with NewsHour content wherever, whenever, and however they want to access it. As part of this transformation, the nightly news program is starting a major new initiative with YouTube.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

What is Happening in Video Monetization News Today?

As I learn more about the detailed processes of video monetization, I am coming across a ton of interesting stories. I’ll start collecting them and making posts here. If the concept goes well, perhaps I’ll start up a new site to focus on monetizing video, licensing fees and other issues and perhaps DRM topics as well.

Early 1950s Television Set
Creative Commons License photo credit: gbaku

You probably know that I’m attempting to get hired by Vidli.com and as such really need to increase my knowledge about online video and how it works from a business model perspective.
The work I did with TheFightChannel.com as we tried to launch that business really got me hip deep into online video. From content delivery networks to transcoding, I learned a lot. In fact, as part of that experience I actually filed two patent pending processes for delivering online video and audio in some interesting and unique ways.
Below are recent stories that seem worthy of in depth study. Thanks!

Kyte & LEVEL Studios Formulate Partnership Allowing Brands & Enterprises to Maximize Online, Social & Mobile Web Presence

Kyte, the online, mobile and social video platform for live and on-demand content and LEVEL Studios, an independent digital agency, today announced the formation of a strategic partnership that will provide brands and corporate enterprises with the ability to maximize their online, social and mobile Web presence through interactive, multi-platform social video experiences. Monster Energy, the leading provider of energy drinks in the United States, is the first brand to benefit from the partnership – having recently unveiled its new Web site designed by LEVEL Studios and incorporating Kyte’s online video platform to engage audiences and build brand awareness across the social Web.

TVDeck Is All Kinds Of Awesome – Finds The Best Videos Online

TVDeck, a newly launched website, wants to organize all the best internet video content, and give it to you with a beautiful UI. In the words of their leader: “TVDeck is a video show search and aggregation site. We find the best videos and categorize them by topic showing the most recent headlines from each show.”

iBNSports and Vootage Raise Standards for High School Sports Broadcastst

Internet sports television network iBN Sports announced today that they have joined forces with their primary competitor for high school sports, Vootage. For the past four years, the two companies have led the way in live broadcasts of high school sports in California and sports fans will now benefit from the strengths of both companies. Vootage’s advanced in-video tagging technology and statistical data tracking will combine with the robust streaming platform and back-end infrastructure of iBN Sports to deliver the most comprehensive high school sports broadcasts on the Internet at the highest quality.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

What is Happening in Video Monetization News Today?

As I learn more about the detailed processes of video monetization, I am coming across a ton of interesting stories. I’ll start collecting them and making posts here. If the concept goes well, perhaps I’ll start up a new site to focus on monetizing video, licensing fees and other issues and perhaps DRM topics as well.

Early 1950s Television Set
Creative Commons License photo credit: gbaku

You probably know that I’m attempting to get hired by Vidli.com and as such really need to increase my knowledge about online video and how it works from a business model perspective.
The work I did with TheFightChannel.com as we tried to launch that business really got me hip deep into online video. From content delivery networks to transcoding, I learned a lot. In fact, as part of that experience I actually filed two patent pending processes for delivering online video and audio in some interesting and unique ways.
Below are recent stories that seem worthy of in depth study. Thanks!

Kyte & LEVEL Studios Formulate Partnership Allowing Brands & Enterprises to Maximize Online, Social & Mobile Web Presence

Kyte, the online, mobile and social video platform for live and on-demand content and LEVEL Studios, an independent digital agency, today announced the formation of a strategic partnership that will provide brands and corporate enterprises with the ability to maximize their online, social and mobile Web presence through interactive, multi-platform social video experiences. Monster Energy, the leading provider of energy drinks in the United States, is the first brand to benefit from the partnership – having recently unveiled its new Web site designed by LEVEL Studios and incorporating Kyte’s online video platform to engage audiences and build brand awareness across the social Web.

TVDeck Is All Kinds Of Awesome – Finds The Best Videos Online

TVDeck, a newly launched website, wants to organize all the best internet video content, and give it to you with a beautiful UI. In the words of their leader: “TVDeck is a video show search and aggregation site. We find the best videos and categorize them by topic showing the most recent headlines from each show.”

iBNSports and Vootage Raise Standards for High School Sports Broadcastst

Internet sports television network iBN Sports announced today that they have joined forces with their primary competitor for high school sports, Vootage. For the past four years, the two companies have led the way in live broadcasts of high school sports in California and sports fans will now benefit from the strengths of both companies. Vootage’s advanced in-video tagging technology and statistical data tracking will combine with the robust streaming platform and back-end infrastructure of iBN Sports to deliver the most comprehensive high school sports broadcasts on the Internet at the highest quality.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

How Could Comcast, NBCU, HULU and Vidli Play Together?

Just finished the well thought out and written article by Jim O’Neill of Fierce Online Video entitled, In Comcast’s NBCU lineup, is there room for Hulu?. Mr. O’Neill lays out what is likely to be how Comcast Cable, the controlling interest in NBCU after agreeing to a joint venture with General Electric will likely operate.
Disney_logo All’s well and good. I suppose. Granted I’ve not done any serious research and obviously don’t know the players, but I have my reservations. When the announcements were starting, my friend @NyahWilliams asked me what I thought. I told her that I’ve no real experience with Comcast as a company, but I do read.
That’s the great thing about the Net. All these blogs, Twitter, various other social interactions. Just paying attention allowed me to have a relatively informed opinion to share with her. I’ve read very little positive about Comcast’s products and customer service.
fox_logoNow they have all the great stuff the Jim outlines in his article, and it causes me to worry about that control; that power they might wield over stuff I like to watch (Chuck, I’m looking at you 😉 )
Anyway, now that I’m striving to get a gig with the Vidli, The Official Video Licensor, it occurred to me that Vidli’s services of offering per video licensing fees might be the perfect solution to help ensure that Hulu stays in operation.
nbcu-logoDon’t get me wrong. I don’t want to pay for content any more than you do; neither do I want to watch 8 to 10 commercial units per break. (WTF are the networks thinking anyway?) I watch the 15 to 30 second break on Hulu shows. Because they force me to. But that’s fine. When it gets upwards to 4 or 5 units? Maybe not.
So, I’m just pondering that if a service like Vidli could land accounts with the copyright holders that provide Hulu with content (talking of course about NBCU, Disney, Fox) then perhaps there could be alternative online video monetization that would give us, the consumers, affordable access to shows with reduced advertising or none whatsoever.
new_vidliJust saying, there are some alternatives for the big players to consider that doesn’t force online video, IPTV, etc to become synonymous with the 60 year old boob tube operations.

How Could Comcast, NBCU, HULU and Vidli Play Together?

Just finished the well thought out and written article by Jim O’Neill of Fierce Online Video entitled, In Comcast’s NBCU lineup, is there room for Hulu?. Mr. O’Neill lays out what is likely to be how Comcast Cable, the controlling interest in NBCU after agreeing to a joint venture with General Electric will likely operate.
Disney_logo All’s well and good. I suppose. Granted I’ve not done any serious research and obviously don’t know the players, but I have my reservations. When the announcements were starting, my friend @NyahWilliams asked me what I thought. I told her that I’ve no real experience with Comcast as a company, but I do read.
That’s the great thing about the Net. All these blogs, Twitter, various other social interactions. Just paying attention allowed me to have a relatively informed opinion to share with her. I’ve read very little positive about Comcast’s products and customer service.
fox_logoNow they have all the great stuff the Jim outlines in his article, and it causes me to worry about that control; that power they might wield over stuff I like to watch (Chuck, I’m looking at you 😉 )
Anyway, now that I’m striving to get a gig with the Vidli, The Official Video Licensor, it occurred to me that Vidli’s services of offering per video licensing fees might be the perfect solution to help ensure that Hulu stays in operation.
nbcu-logoDon’t get me wrong. I don’t want to pay for content any more than you do; neither do I want to watch 8 to 10 commercial units per break. (WTF are the networks thinking anyway?) I watch the 15 to 30 second break on Hulu shows. Because they force me to. But that’s fine. When it gets upwards to 4 or 5 units? Maybe not.
So, I’m just pondering that if a service like Vidli could land accounts with the copyright holders that provide Hulu with content (talking of course about NBCU, Disney, Fox) then perhaps there could be alternative online video monetization that would give us, the consumers, affordable access to shows with reduced advertising or none whatsoever.
new_vidliJust saying, there are some alternatives for the big players to consider that doesn’t force online video, IPTV, etc to become synonymous with the 60 year old boob tube operations.